Saturday, 10 December 2016

Finished Heresy Blood Angles squad


Having honed my technique for painting Blood Angles over the past few months these guys proved an ideal canvass to see how quickly it can be rolled out. Things were made a lot easier by the superb engineering and tooling of this new kit. As I mentioned when I posted my Stormcast, the new GW sprues are, without fail, exceptionally sharp and there are almost no mold lines. The fidelity also aids painting, so picking out the shoulder trims and whatnot was a doddle.

I'm also pretty pleased at how the custom decals worked out. The carrier film is thicker than commercial transfers, and in some cases its edge is a visible but its not too detracting. I'm also happy with the tiny yellow stripe (a 'pale' in heraldic nomenclature) which adds a bit of visual interest and ties these guys in with the rest of the army. As iconography it feels suitably 'Heresy', but it is also the designator of the 2nd Company which these guys were, presumably, later folded-into after the internecine conflict ended.

I added a little more weathering too. Because: Heresy. I didn't want to take it too far, and deliberated about adding the silver chips to the pauldron rims, but this actually worked out better than I expected and serves to lift what might otherwise by slightly dull miniatures. I might try silver rather than gold next time for Mr Bling's shoulder trim. That said, the new GW Gloss Shades are awesome and the patina is super-easy to achieve while retaining the shine.

I also decided to take these guys on patrol to one of the boards at Warhammer World. The reds really pop against the natural tones of the table.




8 comments:

  1. Lovely work all 'round - nicely done!

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  2. Thanks guys! Just working on some classic metal 'Adam Ant' Marine Scouts now.

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  3. They look great, and this terrain is amazing!

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  4. I like how the subtle markings really make them stand out as Heresy era when compared to the 40k "bling marines". Even with the same mark of armor they would be easy to identify.

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    1. Thanks Lasgunpacker. Yes, there is a degree of subtlety to 30K. It's interesting to note that the boldness of 40K does work well on the tabletop. At arm's length you need something bold to have a chance of being visible.

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    2. I agree completely! Having back banners tilt shields with alternate colors and shoulder pads with bold symbols really helps to identify what is going on.

      Now that I think about it, I think this explains much of the early 40k painting style... red boltgun cases and the like really help to identify figures on the table... digital closeup photography and 10001 layers of color really support a different type of painting. All of the (lovely) Pilgrym figures would never stand out in a mass battle, far too subtle and realistic.

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    3. Exactly. Painting for photography and painting for playing mass combat games on a tabletop are two different disciplines, both equally valid. It would be a challenge to find a style that satisfies the requirements of both!

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