Tuesday, 3 January 2012

New work from John Blanche #10

The wonderful J.B. has sent through another magnificent piece so I can share it with you lucky folk.

The Dowager Deaconess poses for us in front of a classic sci-fi vista. You can imagine her asking, or rather telling, her portrait maker to capture her 'from her best side'. The side which partially hides the artificial eye which gleams in its socket of necrotic flesh. Her stern, upright pose might make you think that she has squeezed into her most resplendent corset for this occasion. Her mane of copper cables has been arranged with delicate precision for best effect, perhaps by her dutifully attendant servo-skull we see to her left. Clearly she is in charge, as she wears a 'beard' akin to that sported by the ancient Hatshepsut who wore a similar accoutrement to prove she was as good as any man.

In a magnanimous gesture she makes a little room for the landscape behind her. A neighboring orbital giant looms through the leprous gloom to silhouette a hive of immense - one might say 'Blanche-ian' proportions. It would be as well to pity the poor cutters who reside at the foot of that immense, crushing edifice.

23 comments:

  1. Mr.Blanche keeps raising the level into the new heights piece by piece.
    We are so lucky to be allowed to follow this.

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  2. Wow - this is stunning. Of all the (very) recent work, I think this is my favourite. The yellow hue of the sky reminds me of The Sentinel.

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  3. I'm wondering what exactly it is she has written on those long scrolls draped over and upon her shoulder?

    Love love love seeing this new work.

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  4. They remind me of memorial ribbons - so perhaps the names of the dead.

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  5. This piece is strong, love it.

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  6. I like his use of colour. Maybe I should try this type of non-realistic colouring on miniatures.

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  7. she has retreated into solum servitude into the ecclisiarch hive - the scrolls bare the litanies or the litanic epic poem of how the god emperor lead her recently dead husband thru the glorious exploits of the planetary govenerre in his purge on heretical covens - colours relie on translucent washes of ink in dischordant hues with an overarching very limited palette .......

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  8. What's have you used to paint this with, Mr. JB?

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  9. same as usual - citadel white - rapidograph/black ink - pencil on text- winsor and newton artists inks - orange,brown,yellow,blue- thats all - but lots of dilution, mixing, stained water, and thickened ink - but pushing the envelope in colour mixing and seeking dischords . no analysis its intuitive just have to get stuck in - things cannot be changed as its translucent glaizes or washes and you cannot practice as it essentially is different everytime- sometimes its different and the result stands out from the rest - i cannot control these things to much ....

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  10. Wondrous work! Love the effect that restricted palette has done in here.

    What kind of papers do you usually use when you paint your works, J.B.? i've had some problems finding suitable paper for my projects where I use lots of very diluted paints and end up straightening my water rippled papers under weight...

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  11. ize, do you stretch your paper first? if you use a good watercolour paper and soak it you shouldn't get ripples.

    thanks for that info, JB. I like all these little insights dotted over various blogs.

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  12. i buy cartridge pads from hobbycraft - heavy weight tho ....

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  13. Do you put down a citadel white undercoat first, JB?

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  14. Thank you for the answer, J.B. I've used 160g uncoated paper which is quite thin for water colours. Seems like I have to try and double the weight...

    Fulgrim, I haven't stretched my papers before, definitely will try it the next time, thank you for the hint!

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  15. sorry cant tell you the grammage as i rip the front cover away as it is easier to lean thru when drawing - i find water colour paper has to much textrure that clogs rapidograph nibs .....

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  16. oh yeah, of course, I forgot you were using pens - you'd have to use a hot press watercolour paper which has a flat surface (if you wanted to).

    Ize, 160gsm is pretty thin for anything involving water, 200-300gsm would be better. Stretching paper takes some practice (there's a lot of trial and error) but it's worth it if you want to try something 'inky'.

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  17. mi paper tends to curl but it flattens out because i mount stuff in books - ironed in the past but you have to be careful as it can stick or the ink/paint can lift - im a very low tech illustrator - never look at the grammage or analyse stuff ever - just pretty much go for it - its the doing thats important - anything that does not work out becomes something to manipulate and make work - then its unique - experience and bi teaching your hand/brain/eye your subconcious takes over - just like driving i suppose ......

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  18. yeah - I don't want to sound like I'm trying to teach an old dog new tricks (no offence!) as that wasn't my intent, but things can come across badly when you're writing them down rather than speaking.

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  19. forgot to say - no undercoat - any paint surface can clog rapidographs - dip pens are different of course - mapping pens - flexed lines - stretched paper - different textures of handmade papers - i find all that stuff a bit time consuming and a bit arty farty - draw the line at posh brushes tho - kolinski sable series 7 - its all about learning your craft and developing your own style - this takes years ...

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  20. no offence at all - i came out of a council estate had no education to speak off and i do not do things in a normal way - i use technical pens to create textures and warp and weft of line - i use inks like watercolours - i use ink glaizes like oils and then i paint in an expressive manner on all that - i drip drop splash tear and generally treat mi pictures roughly - i draw tight and paint loose over the top - i draw loose and paint tight over that - i draw slow and colour in very fast - im controlled but then love spontanious accidents - can be an incredible mess - but turning the mess into energy can be rewarding - art college was concerned about head trips and i was never shown any techniques so i just carried on as i always did when i was a kid - now in the studio mi colleagues mess with acrylics oils gesso inks gouache and digital - its all bewildering ........

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  21. haha - arty farty :) yeah, I agree to an extent, although, sometimes you get that for a reason. true, art college is still as you describe (well, I'm going back ten years now myself) and it's only been in the workplace that I've found out about materials and techniques.

    anyway, thanks for all this. your stuff on today's steve buddle update is excellent, too.

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  22. @ize - Try using pressed mount board. I find you can put a lot of liquid on the surface before it starts to disintegrate. Also, if you're using a mapping dip-pen it withstands the 'cuts' the sharp nib makes very well and so you don't get that horrible bleed that less compacted papers can suffer from.

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  23. Thanks for the hint Tamtam! I've sometimes taped my paper on table or board to make it stay straight but had some issues when the thing has started drying...

    J.B., I'm not that much into details either when it comes to the creativity, it's just that I work with different kind of papers - sell it, or more properly put, sell paper and canvas solutions, to be honest - and have great source of stock to choose from and thought if there are some papers that work well with the instruments that I use. Seems like I'm on the right track since I've started using heavy weight paper for my next project...

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