Saturday, 16 January 2010

Phonecam

The great photographer Lee Miller took few photos later in her life. A couple of years before her death she was asked to snap some friends, but declined saying something along the lines of, "Once you have been a professional you can never be an amateur". This neatly sums up how I used to feel about phonecam photography - I considered it too basic and horrific to contemplate.

My opinion has changed recently in response to a long period where I have not taken many photos. Also, I captured the dear old lade below yesterday in a bizarre North London cafe (when I was hunting for a jacket potato for a colleague's lunch). I am attracted by the parallels between vintage photography and phonecam photography (poor lenses, grainy response, long shutter speeds) but dislike the idea of trying to Photoshop the results to look vintage. It seems too dishonest.

I am mooting some ideas so watch this space.

2 comments:

  1. >I am attracted by the parallels between vintage photography and phonecam photography (poor lenses, grainy response, long shutter speeds) but dislike the idea of trying to Photoshop the results to look vintage. It seems too dishonest.

    I'm totally with you on this, and have been playing around with the possibilities myself. If you get a chance, have a look at these two albums - taken with a Nokia 5800:

    Double R Club:
    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=148892&id=624687984&l=44ae4edc43

    Natural History Museum:
    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=179245&id=624687984&l=52ad397394

    Love the pic you snapped of the old lady :) It reminded me of an old lady I spotted on the 7th of November 2002, when I still lived in Leamington Spa, and wrote this about:

    "On my way to the post office today, I saw a remarkable woman. She was quite old, probably in her seventies or eighties. She stood out from all around her by her peculiar and antiquated, but very neat, mode of dress. Her clothes all appeared to be made of fresh clean cotton, or linen, in a combination of white and pale powder-blue. On her head she had a blue bonnet, tied around her chin and, tied at the neck, a blue cloak enfolded her shoulders and white clothes. White stockings led to a pair of flat-soled pale blue shoes, also made of cloth. When I passed her, crossing the street from the Parish church to the post-office, I noticed that her face was powdered white and her cheeks vividly rouged. I paused and watched her for a few seconds as she walked away down Priory Terrace and wondered whether this was an old woman grown young, or a young woman grown old."

    xPx

    ReplyDelete
  2. Love the picture..the quality of phone cams has greatly improved..the camera in my phone is 3.2MP and takes better photos than my first camera did.

    ReplyDelete